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Presentation

Basic Research Team 


"Embryogenesis, Regeneration & Aging"


 

Dr Eric RÖTTINGER, CR1 CNRS, Laureat ATIP AVENIR 2012, Team Leader


Summary


Regeneration is a biological process that follows initial wound healing, during which lost cells, organs or an important part of the animal body are restored to rebuild an entire functional organism. In humans, the process of regeneration is limited to certain cell types and organs. The regenerative capacity reduces with age, which in turn, increases the risk of cancer formation. However, the molecular mechanisms that control the complex interactions between these divers biological processes remain poorly understood.


Interestingly, several marine invertebrates such as planarians and cnidarian (i.e. Hydra, sea anemones, corals) have extreme regenerative capacities, extreme longevity and so far no spontaneously formed tumors have been reported from these animals. Therefore, understanding the molecular mechanism of extreme regeneration may provide insights into the long lasting questions of longevity and cancer.


In the past years, the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis has emerged as a model for evolutionary and developmental questions. Its genome has been sequenced and revealed important conservation with chordates. In addition to a large variety of cellular and molecular tools that are available for this animal, Nematostella vectensis possesses extreme regeneration capacities and display extreme longevity. Thus, this marine invertebrate combines characteristics that make him unique for studying the similarities and differences between embryogenesis and regeneration, as well as the molecular mechanism underlying its extreme longevity.

 

Research Project

Research Projects


Ongoing projects:

1. Understanding the re-deployment of embryonic Gene Regulatory Networks during regeneration.

Embryonic development gives rise to tissues, structures and various cell types are rebuilt during the process of regeneration in order to from a functional adult organism. These observations suggest that similar molecular mechanisms may be deployed during embryogenesis and regeneration. However, the main established whole body regeneration model systems (Hydra, planarian) lack crucial information about the molecular mechanisms underlying embryonic development, mainly due to their limited access to embryonic material.

In order to better understand the similarities and, in particular, the molecular differences between embryogenesis and regeneration, we’re assembling the gene regulatory network (GRN) underlying extreme regeneration in Nematostella vectensis, and compare our findings to the embryonic GRN’s within the same organism.

2. Characterization of key aging elements in an animal with extreme longevity

Aging is a process of physiological deterioration and cellular senescence, which in certain instances can be counteracted by tissue regeneration. How the regenerative process is deployed and controlled within the organism in order to enable an extreme longevity remains largely unsolved. The characterization and study of key aging elements, such as telomere maintenance, in an animal with extreme longevity, could potentially provide new concepts in the field of telomere and aging biology.

In order to address this question, we have started a collaboration with Daniel Lackner (Salk Institute, San Diego, USA) focusing on the initial functional characterization of the telomere complex in Nematostella vectensis.

Press Articles

Regional Newspaper  "Nice-Matin", November 17th, 2014



Research Team


Research Team

                            photo 2015


RÖTTINGER Eric, CR1 CNRS, Team Leader
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AMIEL Aldine, CDD CR INSERM
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FOUCHER Kevin, PhD Student
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JOHNSTON Hereroa, PhD Student

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MORAIN Jonas, Master 2 INSERM

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NEDELJKOVIC Gordana, Post Doc UNS

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NEDONCELLE Karine, Post Doc INSERM
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SCARZELLO Sabine, Engineer CNRS
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WARNER Jacob, Post Doc INSERM
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Tel.: +33 (0)4 93 37 77 39

(Feb 2016)


Publications

Publications


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=eric+roettinger



2016


Layden MJ, Rentzsch F & Röttinger E

The rise of the starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis as a model system

to investigate development and regeneration.

Wiley Interdiscip., Rev Dev Biol. 2016 Feb 19. doi: 10.1002/wdev.222



2015


Amiel RA, Johnston H, Nedoncelle K, Warner J, Ferreira S & Röttinger E

Characterization of Morphological and Cellular Events Underlying Oral Regeneration

in the Sea Anemone, Nematostella vectensis.

Int J Mol Sci, 2015;16(12):28449-71.


Botman D., Jansson F., Röttinger E., Martindale MQ., de Jong J. and Kaandorp A J.

Analysis of a spatial gene expression database for sea anemone Nematostella vectensis

during early development

BMC Systems Biology, 2015;9:63.


Dattoli AA, Hink MA., DuBuc QT., Teunisse BJ., Goedhart J., Röttinger E. and Postma M.

Characterization of the Nematostella vectensis SNAILA and SNAILB reveals a novel function for

zinc finger domains as determinants of nucleolar localization and mobility.

Scientific Reports, 2015;5:12147.


Röttinger E**, DuBuc QT, Amiel RA, Martindale MQ

Nodal signaling is required for mesodermal and ventral but not for dorsal fates

in the indirect developing hemichordate, Ptychodera flava.

Biology OPEN, 2015,15;4(7):830-42.


2014


DuBuc QT, Dattoli AA, Babonis LS, Salinas-Saavedra M, Röttinger E, Martindale MQ, Postma M.
In vivo imaging of Nematostella vectensis embryogenesis and late development using fluorescent probes.
BMC Cell Biology, 2014, 15:44.


Botman D, Röttinger E, Martindale MQ, de Jong J, Kaandorp JA.

A computational approach towards a gene regulatory network for the developing Nematostella vectensis gut.

PLoS One, 2014, 89(7):e103341.


2013


Layden MJ, Röttinger E, Wolenski FS, Gilmore TD, Martindale MQ.

Microinjection of mRNA or morpholinos for reverse genetic analysis in the starlet sea anemone, Nematostella vectensis.

Nat. Protoc., 2013, May;8(5):924-34.


2012


Röttinger E, Dahlin P, Martindale QM

A Framework to establish a Cnidarian Gene Regulatory Network for “Endomesoderm” Specification: The inputs of ß-catenin/TCF signaling.

PLOS Genetics, 2012, 8(12):e1003164.


Bessodes N, Haillot E, Duboc V, Röttinger E, Lepage T.

Reciprocal signaling between the ectoderm and a mesendodermal left-right organizer directs left-right determination in the sea urchin embryo.

PLOS Genetics, 2012, 8(12):e1003121.

Marlow H, Röttinger E, Boekhout M, Martindale QM.

Functional Roles of Notch Signaling in the Cnidarian Nematostella vectensis.

Developmental Biology, 2012, 362(2):295:308.

Röttinger E, Lowe JC.

Evolutionary crossroads in developmental biology: Hemichordata. 

Development, 2012,139, 2463-2475.


2011


Ormestad M, Martindale QM, Röttinger E.

A comparative gene expression database for invertebrates.

EvoDevo, 2011, 2:17.

Röttinger E, Martindale QM.

Ventralization of an indirect developing hemichordate by NiCl2 suggest a conserved

mechanism in dorso-ventral (D/V) patterning in Ambulacraria (Hemichordates and Echinoderms).

Developmental Biology, 2011, 354 (1), 173-190, Cover Image


2010


Saudemont A, Haillot E, Mekpoh F, Bessodes N, Quirin M, Lapraz F, Duboc V, Röttinger E,

Range R, Oisel A, Besnardeau L, Wincker P, Lepage T.

Gene Regulatory Network Analysis of Ectoderm Specification in an Echinoderm Reveals

Ancestral Regulatory Circuits Regulating Mouth Formation and Neural Induction.

PLOS Genetics, 2010, 6 (12), e1001259.


2009


Nomaksteinsky M, Röttinger E, Dufour HD, Chettouh Z, Lowe JC, Martindale QM, Brunet JF.

Centralization of the deuterostome nervous system predates chordates.

Current Biology, 2009, 19, 1-6, Cover Image


2008


Röttinger E, Saudemont A, Duboc V, Besnardeau L, McClay D, Lepage T.

FGF signals guide migration of mesenchymal cells, control morphogenesis of the skeleton

and regulate gastrulation during sea urchin development.

Development, 2008, 135, 353-65.


2006


Weinstock GM, Gibbs RA, Sodergren E, Davidson EH, Cameron RA & the Sea Urchin

sequencing consortium.

The genome of the Sea Urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus.

Science, 2006, 314, 914-952.


Lapraz F, Röttinger E, Duboc V, Range R, Duloquin L, Walton K, Wu S, Bradham C,

Loza M, Wilson K, McClay D, Gache C, Lepage T.

Genes for Receptors Tyrosine Kinases and TGFβ signalling pathways encoded in the sea

urchin genome.

Developmental Biology, 2006, 300 (1), 132-52.

Röttinger E* &  Croce J*, Lhomond G, Besnardeau L, Gache C, Lepage T.

Nemo-Like Kinase (NLK) acts in the Delta/Notch pathway to downregulate the

activity of TCF in the sea urchin embryo.

Development, 2006, 133, 4341-4353.


Röttinger E, Besnardeau L, Lepage T.

Expression Pattern of three RNA-binding proteins during early development of the

sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus.

Gene Expression Patterns, 2006, Vol. 8, 864-872.


2005


Duboc V*. &  Röttinger E*, Lapraz  F, Besnardeau L, Lepage T.

Rudiment formation and left-right asymmetry in the sea urchin embryo is

regulated by a Nodal/Antivin/Pitx2 pathway acting on the right side.

Developmental Cell, 2005, Vol. 9, 147-158.


2004


Duboc V, Röttinger E, Besnardeau L, Lepage T.

Nodal and BMP2/4 Signaling Organizes the Oral-Aboral Axis of the Sea Urchin Embryo.

Developmental Cell, 2004, Vol. 6, 397-410.

Röttinger E, Besnardeau L, Lepage T.

A Raf/MEK/ERK signaling pathway is required for development of the sea

urchin micromere lineage trough phosphorylation of the transcription factor Ets.

Development, 2004, 131, 1075-1087.


* shared authorships


REFEREED REVIEW ARTICLES


Leclère L & Röttinger E..: Muscle regeneration in Cnidaria, overview and perspectives.  Frontiers in Developmental and Cell Biology (in preparation, 2016)


Layden M., Rentzsch F. & Röttinger E.: The rise of the starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis as a model system to investigate development and regeneration. WIREs  Developmental Biology (2016)


Belaid A., Ndiaye DP., Roux J., Röttinger E., Graba Y., Brest P., Hofman P., Mograbi B.: Autophagy: Moving bench side promises to patient bedsides. Current Cancer Drug Targets. Current Cancer Drug Targets., In press (2015)


Röttinger E. & Lowe JC.: Evolutionary crossroads in developmental biology: Hemichordata.  Development, 139, 2463-2475 (2012)


BOOK CHAPTERS


Kaul-Strehlow S. & Röttinger E: Hemichordata. In: Evolutionary Developmental Biology of Invertebrates. Editor: Andreas Wanninger. Springer-Verlag GMBH / Vienna (2015).


Ormestad M., Amiel A., Röttinger E.**: Ex-situ Macro Photography of Marine Life. In: Imaging Marine Life: Modern Imaging techniques in Marine Biology. Editor: Emmanuel G. Reynaud. Wiley VCH / Weinheim (2013).



OUTREACH PUBLICATIONS


Röttinger E, Amiel RA, Le Bescot N, Gutierrez-Heredia L, Flood P & Reynaud GE: Dreaming of a digital ocean …


Röttinger E. & Reynaud GE. : Tara Oceans: Imaging on a boat. Labor & More 7 / 2013



*shared authorship, ** corresponding author



(Feb 2016)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Financial Grants


Financial Grants

   

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  7th Framework Programme     ...........  

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